An analysis of the soliloquies in the play hamlet by willliam shakespeare

hamlets fourth soliloquy

Act 1, Scene 2 O all you host of heaven! Through vows and promises, Hamlet's oral reaction to the King's request exposes his full will for revenge. In these seven soliloquies, Hamlet shares his inner feelings, thoughts, and plans for the future.

An analysis of the soliloquies in the play hamlet by willliam shakespeare

His thoughts are of death and decay. Apart from desiring suicide, he also states that he is finding the world 'weary, stale, flat and unprofitable'. He decides that fears concerning the puzzling and 'dreadful' afterlife, together with the conscience, cause people to bear the wrongs inflicted during their life on earth, rather than commit suicide and risk offending God. He believes that his uncle is wicked and deserves to die. Scene 2: 'Now I am alone. Because Hamlet is waiting for what he considers a better opportunity to kill his uncle this creates anticipation for the audience as they will be wondering when and how Hamlet will achieve his ultimate revenge. In Hamlet, the main character Hamlet thinks to himself about suicide. One night, Hamlet sees the ghost of his father, who tells him that his death was not natural. The big question that Hamlet is trying to answer for himself during the course of this soliloquy is whether or not it is noble to take up arms and die defending what you believe is right. O God! When Hamlet is remarking on such people, he is actually talking about himself. Hamlet is aware that it is time to take action because he has figured out the truth about what his uncle has done. There are many secrets and no one knows that the original king was killed by his brother.

The second time which the audience sees Hamlet speak in a soliloquy is in scene 5 of act 1 when Hamlet has just met the ghost of his father and has received some disturbing news. This closing line gives the audience a chance to connect with Hamlet because it is easy for one to understand feelings of being wronged and wanting to get revenge.

The first of these occurs before he has seen the Ghost. Each of the seven soliloquies allows the audience a deeper perspective into who Hamlet is as a character as he reveals his thoughts, advances the plot and adds atmosphere.

Hamlets seven soliloquies reveal his character

Death is still something that he finds appealing, 'tis a consummation devoutly to be wished'. Similarities in Hamlet's Three Soliloquies All three speeches illustrate a man, confused and wracked by grief, wanting revenge, but not knowing how to go about responding to what has happened. While these soliloquies are, of course, spoken by the characters, they offer the reader some insight into Shakespeare's concerns about the human condition. He wonders if he is a coward, since he does not 'cleave the general ear with horrid speech' or 'make mad the guilty and appal the free'. Hamlet reveals to the audience that he feels that if a man has no purpose he is no better than a beast so he must use his encounter with Fortinbras to spur his revenge. Yet, even death troubles him, as to die might mean to dream and he worries about the dreams he might have to endure, 'in that sleep of death what dreams may come'. He is uncertain of his own feelings and how to cope with them. During the course of this speech Hamlet makes several allusions to historical figures and this demonstrates to the audience that he is an intelligent young man.

During the course of this speech Hamlet makes several allusions to historical figures and this demonstrates to the audience that he is an intelligent young man. Hamlet reveals that he feels he has taken a cowardly approach to making sure that the ghost was telling the truth and that his uncle really is the murderer but he also discloses that he is worried the ghost may have been the devil.

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Essay on Soliloquies in Hamlet by William Shakespeare