Boy meets girl 1984

There's so many moments in this that confirm to me that I'm about to adore some of Leos Carax's other works.

denis lavant

One of the most melancholic feeling films I've seen. The parts that I equally admired and was irritated by where when it would just cut off in the middle of a conversation.

Boy meets girl 1984

I usually let this slide because it's a nice slide and I'd prefer to believe in the slide rather than decry it and stay angstily sitting at the top squinting at those who do slide. From Jean Cocteau to David Bowie and Jean-Luc Godard, Carax makes it obvious that he is madly in love with the arts, especially cinema, and that he wants us to love the things he does. Something else that sets Carax apart is his being unafraid to put a a lot of himself into his films. In Boy Meets Girl, Carax shows audiences a scrapbook of his most beloved cinematic possessions. The black and white look is stunning, thanks to some superb cinematography which really lets you know what this film is from the very beginning - it's a stylistic lack of plot, a movie you feel rather than just see and also a lot of young Denis Lavant always a plus. When every inmate dons a silver tongue and every line that slithers out of every mouth sounds as if it had been rehearsed beforehand a thousand times in front of a thousand different mirrors? I definitely want to see more of Leos Carax's films now. Similarly, Mireille is depressed, but unlike Alex, she is much more hermetic about the reasons behind her sadness. So many sequences visualized the pain in beautiful ways—the imposition of a face of a lover across half the screen, the protagonist watching a couple kiss like they are in a perfume ad, the moment we hear the voiceover of his ex discussing sex with her new partner though we never see it. For example, there is an enigmatically beautiful shot in Boy Meets Girl in which Alex uses a Xerox machine in a room with mirrored walls. This is an excellent first feature, I think I love his style. He makes multiple references to silent cinema, directly through quotations and indirectly through the way in which he turns Perrier into an otherworldly version of Lillian Gish and Falconetti. Yet his entire worldview is turned upside down when he sees this angel.

He then shoots a black-and-white, guerrilla-style feature on the streets of his beloved Paris that's met with equal parts acclaim and incredulity. Yeah, Leos Carax's origin story isn't exactly novel, but it's hard to blame a guy for trying to recreate a proven recipe for success.

So he cobbles together a script that's like every one of his cinematic idols tossed into a blender.

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Carax bonds them through shared misery, and yet the film thrives with romantic optimism, for we long to see them make it. Jose Solis 21 Jan Leo Carax sculpts together cinema references and turns them into something new, only later allowing the influences behind specific pieces to make sense in your mind. Stunningly shot in black and white by Jean-Yves Escoffier, who makes a playful use of contrasts and shadows, Boy Meets Girl serves as a great canvas for Carax to share some of his passions and obsessions. I usually let this slide because it's a nice slide and I'd prefer to believe in the slide rather than decry it and stay angstily sitting at the top squinting at those who do slide. Similarly, Mireille is depressed, but unlike Alex, she is much more hermetic about the reasons behind her sadness. The black and white look is stunning, thanks to some superb cinematography which really lets you know what this film is from the very beginning - it's a stylistic lack of plot, a movie you feel rather than just see and also a lot of young Denis Lavant always a plus. In Boy Meets Girl, Carax shows audiences a scrapbook of his most beloved cinematic possessions. There's so many moments in this that confirm to me that I'm about to adore some of Leos Carax's other works. I definitely want to see more of Leos Carax's films now. One of the most melancholic feeling films I've seen.

The film hits every note of both…. From Jean Cocteau to David Bowie and Jean-Luc Godard, Carax makes it obvious that he is madly in love with the arts, especially cinema, and that he wants us to love the things he does.

Agghhhh haha. There is not much by way of plot in Boy Meets Girl; everything is essentially contained in the title. The black and white cinematography was stunning and it was just plain weird at times with trancelike performances.

mireille perrier
Rated 9/10 based on 13 review
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Boy Meets Girl